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In each panel I will show you step by step how to create a Celtic Dragon from a Celtic knot. Each new step will be in red. As you go through the panels, old steps will turn gold, and there will be a new step highlighted, again in red.




Here we have a little knot that I made up. To make your Dragon, you must find a place in the regular knot that you want to break. This is where your head and tail will meet when it becomes a Dragon. On this example, I have chosen to make my break at the top of the knot. This I think shows off the little dragon-to-be better than if I had broken it at the bottom, side or middle. Each knot you transform into a Dragon you must decide where best to put his head, because that is the place the interest will be drawn to.


I have added his head here, and as well curled his tail around under his chin. The knot or body of the Dragon was tapered where it came to the tail, as we did in the Snake into a Dragon section. On this Dragon I have also added a crest, which is of course optional. Because the knot was fairly fat, there was not a whole lot of work to make this knot into a Dragon. If it had been a really thin knot, I may have made the body thicken in the Dragon's middle again, but he looks okay as he is here, so I'll leave it. As usual, the most work in making the Dragons is their heads, which I'll show you in the next step.


To make this style of Dragon head, first I will draw the top of his head and his throat. The top of his head has one bend in it, which will become his eyebrow, and a curve underneath makes the throat.

Now we need to join the top of his head with his throat, which we do by making a line that starts at the throat, goes around the cheekbone, scoops in to the muzzle area, and then around the mouth to join with the nose.

All there is left to add is the eye, and on this version I have also added a headcrest to spiffy him up a little. This is how I draw my Dragons (kind of my signature style), try some ideas from other other cultures, like Chinese or medieval for example, to create new themes of Dragons!


If you're enjoying these tutorials, don't forget that you can get a collected workbook edition, in both an instant PDF downloable eBook edition, as well as a coil bound print edition! These working copies have much more information than these online versions do, more explanations, examples, exercises to work through... become a Celtic art master!


All tutorials copyright Cari Buziak, 1995-current